The Accuracy of Self-Reported Blood Pressure in the Medication Adherence Improvement Support App For Engagement–Blood Pressure (MedISAFE-BP) Trial: Implications for Pragmatic Trials

June 30, 2020
Publications

The Accuracy of Self-Reported Blood Pressure in the Medication Adherence Improvement Support App For Engagement–Blood Pressure (MedISAFE-BP) Trial: Implications for Pragmatic Trials

June 30, 2020
Publications

The Accuracy of Self-Reported Blood Pressure in the Medication Adherence Improvement Support App For Engagement–Blood Pressure (MedISAFE-BP) Trial: Implications for Pragmatic Trials

Haff N, Lauffenburger JC, Morawski K, Ghazinouri R, Noor N, Kumar S, Juusola J, Choudhry NK

June 30, 2020
Publications

The Accuracy of Self-Reported Blood Pressure in the Medication Adherence Improvement Support App For Engagement–Blood Pressure (MedISAFE-BP) Trial: Implications for Pragmatic Trials

June 30, 2020
Publications
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Self-report of health conditions and behaviors is one potential strategy to increase the pace of enrollment into pragmatic clinical trials. In this study, we assessed the accuracy of self-reported poorly controlled hypertension among adults in the community who were screened for participation in the MedISAFE-BP trial. Of individuals who self-reported poorly controlled hypertension using the online trial enrollment platform, 64% had a systolic blood pressure less than 140 mm Hg when measured at home. Although we identified several characteristics associated with accurate self-report including older age (odds ratio [OR] 1.02 per year, 95% CI 1.01-1.03), diabetes (OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.17-2.14), and low health activation (OR 1.56 95% CI 1.17-2.07), we were unable to identify patients for whom self-reported hypertension would be a reliable method for their inclusion in a pragmatic trial.

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